High doses of type I IFNs for cancer therapy act through non-haematopoetic endothelial cells.
http://bit.ly/1pjyGpu 
Image: Coloured scanning electron micrograph (SEM) of a resin cast of blood vessels supplying the small intestine. Credit: Susuma Nishinaga

High doses of type I IFNs for  therapy act through non-haematopoetic endothelial cells.

 

Image: Coloured scanning electron micrograph (SEM) of a resin cast of blood vessels supplying the small intestine. Credit: Susuma Nishinaga

bpod-mrc:

15 September 2014
Refusing to Fuse
Our skull may look and feel solid but it’s actually made up of 28 separate bones that fuse together during development. Having multiple junctions allows the skull to squeeze through the birth canal and then keep up with rapid brain growth. If this process is not perfectly orchestrated, however, children can be born with serious deformations. Cleft palates, which affect one in 700 newborns, are a case in point, caused when the two arch-like plates in the roof of their mouth fail to come together in the womb. Left with a hole in their palate, children can develop speech and feeding problems. The central pin-shaped blue region shows this gap in the skull of a mouse lacking a specific protein implicated in palate formation. In healthy animals with this protein, this space does not exist as the surrounding bones (coloured in pink) close in and fuse together before birth.
Written by Jan Piotrowski
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Image by Juhee Jeong and colleaguesNew York University College of Dentistry, USAOriginally published under a Creative Commons Licence (BY 2.0)Research published in BMC Developmental Biology, August 2014
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You can also follow BPoD on Twitter and Facebook

bpod-mrc:

15 September 2014

Refusing to Fuse

Our skull may look and feel solid but it’s actually made up of 28 separate bones that fuse together during development. Having multiple junctions allows the skull to squeeze through the birth canal and then keep up with rapid brain growth. If this process is not perfectly orchestrated, however, children can be born with serious deformations. Cleft palates, which affect one in 700 newborns, are a case in point, caused when the two arch-like plates in the roof of their mouth fail to come together in the womb. Left with a hole in their palate, children can develop speech and feeding problems. The central pin-shaped blue region shows this gap in the skull of a mouse lacking a specific protein implicated in palate formation. In healthy animals with this protein, this space does not exist as the surrounding bones (coloured in pink) close in and fuse together before birth.

Written by Jan Piotrowski

Image by Juhee Jeong and colleagues
New York University College of Dentistry, USA
Originally published under a Creative Commons Licence (BY 2.0)
Research published in BMC Developmental Biology, August 2014

You can also follow BPoD on Twitter and Facebook

CRISPR genome editing removes integrated HIV from human host cells.
http://bit.ly/ZnZKz0
Image: The internal structure of HIV. We can see the conical red capsid, and the viral membrane in blue. The yellow area between the core and the membrane of the virus is the lateral body; it includes proteases and remnants of material from the host cell. Credit: Stephen Fuller

CRISPR  editing removes integrated HIV from human host cells.

Image: The internal structure of HIV. We can see the conical red capsid, and the viral membrane in blue. The yellow area between the core and the membrane of the virus is the lateral body; it includes proteases and remnants of material from the host cell. Credit: Stephen Fuller

currentsinbiology:

Stalked protozoan attached to a filamentous green algae with bacteria on its surface (160x)
Paul W. Johnson
University of Rhode Island, Kingston, Rhode Island, USA
Technique: Nomarski Differential Interference Contrast

currentsinbiology:

Stalked protozoan attached to a filamentous green algae with bacteria on its surface (160x)

Paul W. Johnson

University of Rhode Island, Kingston, Rhode Island, USA

Technique: Nomarski Differential Interference Contrast

A signature of interferon-related immune reactions activated by the seasonal flu vaccine.
http://bit.ly/WT85Zu
Image credit: Nakaya et al 2011, Nature Reviews Immunology

A signature of interferon-related  reactions activated by the seasonal .

Image credit: Nakaya et al 2011, Nature Reviews Immunology